HANDS ON HABITAT

VOLUNTEERING TO HELP BEAVER - UPCOMING PROJECTS

Throughout Central and Eastern Oregon volunteer opportunities abound to enhance beaver habitat and (ultimately) beaver success on the landscape working with local area agencies and nonprofits to kickstart the conditions needed for beaver to be successful. Whether you're looking for a short day trip close to home, or a longer 2-4 day trip where you can really dig into the dirt, there's much work to be done and hands-on, hard-working volunteers can really help make a difference!

Want to be notified of upcoming projects?


Restoration orgs: Have an upcoming project benefiting beavers with volunteer opportunities to contribute?  Please send us details and information where volunteers can sign up, via email to info@beaverworks.org.

NOVEMBER 25th | SISTERS, OR 
Tour de Beaver

Join the Deschutes Land Trust for a tour de beaver at Camp Polk Meadow Preserve! The Land Trust recently worked with our restoration partners to build some structures in Whychus Creek that mimic the work of beavers and the ways they engineer nature. See the new beaver-inspired dams and juniper log structures that are changing the way Whychus Creek moves around Camp Polk Meadow Preserve..

Trip Lead:  Deschutes Land Trust
Get more details on this trip here.


PAST PROJECTS

NOVEMBER 11-13 | TUMALO, OR 
Help to build beaver 'grocery stores'

Help plant trees this Fall along the Deschutes River. Established, varied native vegetation (such as cottonwoods, dogwood, willow, aspen, currants and more...) is absolutely vital to beavers' long term success in riparian zones. These species are beaver favorites and provide dam building, lodge building materials and also beavers' favorite and most nutritious food source. Read more on what beaver eat, here.

Trip Lead:  Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA)
Get more details on this trip here.

OCTOBER 22-25 | COTTONWOOD CANYON (Near Morrow, OR)
Help to protect beaver 'grocery stores'

Install vegetation exclosures that help to keep browser wildlife (like deer, antelope and even beavers) at bay, and give new riparian vegetation a head start to get established. Once the vegetation is well-established and can withstand browsing and the benefits of coppicing, the fencing will be removed so that beaver can move into the area more successfully with cupboards full of nutritious groceries (so to speak).

Trip Lead: Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA)
Get more details on this trip here.

OCTOBER 22 & 23 DAY TRIPS | CAMP POLK MEADOW PRESERVE (Near Sisters, OR)
Help to build artificial beaver dams

Beaver Dam Analogues (BDAs) are a restoration tool that helps slow down and pool up stream water flows - similar to what might happen with a real beaver dam. BDA's are a low-tech, low-cost solution installed by people (vs. heavy machinery). Over time, pooled up water benefits nearby vegetation looking to grow and flourish and multiply. Learn more about BDAs here.

Trip Lead:  Deschutes Land Trust (DLT)
-Get more details about the October 22 trip here.
-Get more details about the October 23 trip here.

NOVEMBER 1-4 | COTTONWOOD CANYON (Near Morrow, OR)
Help to build beaver 'grocery stores'

Help plant trees this Fall along a tributary to the John Day River. Established, varied native vegetation (such as cottonwoods, dogwood, willow, aspen, currants and more...) is absolutely vital to beavers' long term success in riparian zones. These species are beaver favorites and provide dam building, lodge building materials and also beavers' favorite and most nutritious food source. Read more on what beaver eat, here.

Trip Lead:  Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA)
Get more details on this trip here.

Interested to Learn More and Get Involved with this project as it builds?